Rod and Kyle: Uncensored After Dark

AAD with Rod and Kyle

Rod Tritone, author Judi Fennell, author Stephanie Julian, Kyle Rossini

Scene: The overcrowded bar of a large hotel somewhere on the eastern seaboard. It’s after midnight. There are mostly women talking, laughing and drinking. And drinking.

Rod Tritone rocks the no-longer-frosted beer mug in his hand, and keeps his head down. Those women have been eyeing him but he’s happily married, and he’s got the weight of the Mer world on his shoulders since he’s just taken over the throne. A land-based excursion wasn’t exactly high on his list of priorities at the moment–especially since his honeymoon wasn’t all that long ago. Luckily, Kyle Rossini, one of the few people who knows what he really is enters the bar at that moment.

Kyle: Hey, man. I was beginning to think I was the only testosterone in this place. I need a drink. All these women… (He slouches into the chair next to Rod, making sure his back’s to the wall and he had a clear view of all the exits) I’d rather be out on a run but this place is a concrete jungle. Hell, even New York City has Central Park.

Rod: And an aquarium. I can’t believe I let The Council talk me into this. The last place I need to be is surrounded by a bunch of Humans. I’ve got an ocean to run. (Drains his beer and nods to the waitress for another.) So how’d you get roped into this?

Kyle: Hell if I know. Tam and Steph were talking one night and the next thing I knew they were eyeing me like a side of beef. Then the lucani king decided I should come, have a look around. See what the humans say about us. I don’t have time for this shit. I’ve got three new sicari to train. Assassins don’t grow on trees, you know. Although I’ve got one who I swear was born to it. What about you?

Rod: Angel—you remember my younger sister, right? She’s all over me about doing some Human-Mer “dialogue” to get relations going between the races. I, frankly, think it’d be better to wait another few hundred years at the very least before we begin to even consider letting  them know we exist, but Val and Judi mentioned this gathering. (Inclines his head toward the readers milling around the bar.) Their argument is that the Humans most likely to accept new “beings” would be paranormal readers. I’m getting the lay of the land, so to speak. Must say, these women do have some very open minds.

Kyle: Yeah, that masquerade party last night was wild, all the wings and vampire fangs. I swear some of them actually believe in magic. I had a brief moment of insanity where I thought about giving them a real show. Just shifting into my pelt right in the middle of the dance floor. Would have loved to see their faces. Hell, most don’t believe we exist. But I know some of them wish we did. My daughter Cat would have a ball talking to all these writers. She loved Judi’s IN OVER HER HEAD.

Rod: I’ll have to mention that to Reel. Some of the readers jokingly asked Judi where Rod and I were, and they thought she was kidding when she said we were in her room. Good thing no one thought to check. My wife would have had serious issues with that. Being descended from the gods is one thing. Having people think I am one, entirely another. (Takes the frosted mug from the waitress as Kyle orders a 7&7.) Good thing Reel headed back to Ocean City. Two mermen walking around the place would be a bit much. Of course, I see Scarlata managed to convince everyone her pink wings were part of her costume. Wonder what they’d say if they knew there was a real Etruscan fairy hanging at the party with them.

Kyle: (snort) Yeah, Scarlata had way too much fun playing with the humans. I think pregnancy has softened her up. Of course, she’d have my head if she ever heard me say that. Too bad Justin couldn’t come. He would have had a field day with all these people talking about werewolves and fairies and Mer people. I’m surprised Scarlata showed up at all but Steph promised she’d torment Tivr in more stories, so she agreed. Scarlata really doesn’t like that god. Don’t know why. He’s been a good friend to my daughter. Cat’s got a serious case of puppy love for the guy. Of course, if he hurts her, there’s gonna be trouble. I don’t care if he is the freaking Etruscan God of the Moon. I’m sure you’d feel the same about Angel.

Rod: I hear you. My problem with Angel is that she’s always been so gung-ho on Humans that I’m worried she might go looking for her “catch of a lifetime,” and you know what kind of havoc that can cause. You’d think she’d realize after the shit Reel and I went through when we were kids and pulled the prank that almost exposed our world to Humans, that Humans aren’t ready for us, but she keeps insisting they are. It takes a certain type of Human to accept that they’re not the only swimmers in the sea. (Raises his beer halfway to his lips, but then stops and smiles ruefully.) Although, I guess the fact that Reel married one and my wife is half-Human doesn’t really help my argument, does it?

Kyle: (pauses as he takes his drink from the harried waitress) I know what you mean. My Tam doesn’t have any magic at all. But she’s coming up to speed pretty fast. She doesn’t get freaked out when Cat or I come home in our pelts. She’s still having trouble with the whole Gods and Goddesses thing, though. And I’m still damn worried about whoever tried to kidnap her It pisses me off that I don’t have a clue where to even start looking. And I don’t think they’re finished.

Rod: You might want to start with those closest to you. Drake was the last person I’d have suspected when that albatross turned mercenary and recruited half the bird population of Kansas to derail our run for the coast. Guy’s just not that bright. Which he proved with his ridiculous plan, but still— (There’s a disturbance at the end of the bar. A man joins the women, sporting a red leather hat with horns.) Hey—did you get a load of him? Think he might be your guy?

Kyle: (gives an amused laugh) Yeah, probably not. But that writer, Joey W. Hill, she looks like she might know more about secret societies than she’s letting on. Have you seen those vampire books she writes? (shakes his head and downs half his drink) The woman has some serious inside information. Anyway, when I get back tomorrow, I’ve gotta get Kaine out on the trail. She’s an even better tracker than her father, and that’s saying something. And Nic and Duke need to shake a few trees, see what falls out. You heading out tomorrow?

Rod: Out of the hotel, but not too far. Reel and Erica brought in another load of Blackbeard’s treasure from my old place in the wild blue under. I dole it out every so often to keep up the stock in Val’s mother’s gift shop and fund their operation of keeping Humans away from the kimberlite veins and Mer kingdom. I told them I’d stop by to help catalogue some of that stuff. I found that pile when I was a teenager out manta-surfing with some friends. Never would have figured it’d come in handy to keep Humans away from our world, you know? Of course, that Joey Hill you mentioned… Looks like someone clued her into my world as well as yours. Wonder where she gets her information.

Kyle: No idea. But we definitely don’t need the humans figuring out there are people like us in the world. It’s be all pitchforks and lab instruments for us. Hey, thanks for the company. I’m gonna head back to my room, hopefully get some sleep. Hate sleeping without Tam. (shakes his head with a rueful) Yeah, I know. I’m pathetic.

Rod: (pats Kyle on the back and stands) Yeah, without the women we love, aren’t we all?

The guys depart, leaving behind a couple of hungry gazes, more than a few “check-them-outs,” and a roomful of female sighs.

Ah, the tribulations of being a romance hero at a readers’ conference.

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Question: What Do Judi Fennell and Johnny Depp have in common?

Answer: They both created a character named Sparrow.

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Q: What do Adele Dubois & Johnny Depp have in common?

Answer: They both play characters named Sparrow.

 

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Call me Sparrow… Cap’n Sparrow.
…Or is that Miss Sparrow?

Yes, I’m talking about the cute, little brown birds. But I’m also talking about the hot and sexy pirate played by Johnny Depp. Okay, the pirate’s not so sexy (hot, in a rum-soaked-island-sun sort of way, yes, but not hot, as in sexy) but Johnny Depp sure was when he played Cap’n Jack.

And what in the world, you’re wondering, do the two have in common?

Yes, there is a method to my madness, and, no, it’s not the rum-soaked one of the Cap’n’s. (Are all those apostrophes correct?)

My current series on the shelves is about Mers: Mermen and Mermaids (though the maid part went by the quayside a while ago). And when writing about Mers one will naturally mention pirates. Or Johnny Depp. Or both. (And who doesn’t love the Johnny Depp reference?)

So, yes, there’s a Johnny Depp line in my first book, In Over Her Head, that sealed the deal for my agent. She loved that line, knew she liked my humor and our relationship was born.

The humor also sealed the deal with my editor, and along came book 2, Wild Blue Under, which launched this November 3rd. Now this story is about Rod, a Mer Prince who comes onto land (Kansas, because it’s as far as you can get from the ocean in the Continental US) to bring the lost half-Mer princess back to Atlantis. Only she doesn’t want to go, because, really. Mermen? Atlantis? Yeah, right. Matter of fact, she’s allergic to ocean water. No way, no how, is she going to the ocean.

And then the attacks start.

What attacks you ask? What kind of attacks could possibly get her moving?

Try dive-bombing peregrines and a mercenary albatross.

Now you see where the bird connection comes in.

But the sparrows are the good guys, er, ladies. Yes, Maybelle and Adele help thwart the evil villains and save the Prince and Princess so they can resume their rightful place on the throne of Atlantis.
Sadly, it’s not as easy as all that, and our hero and heroine – as well as the two industrious little sparrows – have a whole bunch of things to overcome.

Kind of like I did when I wrote this story.

And it’s thanks to my good friend Adele Dubois (seeing the tie-in with the sparrow now???) that I could get the research I needed for the cross-country dash to the coast.

Adele, fortuitously enough for me, was on her way to a drive out to the Midwest, along the same route I wanted my hero and heroine to travel, and she so very helpfully grabbed brochures and emailed me the sights & sounds, and her impressions of the trip, all of which were utilized in my story. She continued her trip to research her book, Desert Nectar

So, as Adele Dubois saved the day for my dearth of first-hand research, so, too, does Adele the Sparrow save the day for the hero and heroine.

*****
Visit award-winning author Adele Dubois at www.adeledubois.com and check out her latest release:

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According to Jane… and Marilyn

In Marilyn Brant’s smart, wildly inventive debut, one woman in search of herself receives advice from the ultimate expert in matters of the heart. . .

It begins one day in sophomore English class, just as Elliaccordingtojane[1]e Barnett’s teacher is assigning Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. From nowhere comes a quiet “tsk” of displeasure. The target: Sam Blaine, the cute bad boy who’s teasing Ellie mercilessly, just as he has since kindergarten. Entirely unbidden, as Jane might say, the author’s ghost has taken up residence in Ellie’s mind, and seems determined to stay there.

Jane’s wise and witty advice guides Ellie through the hell of adolescence and beyond, serving as the voice she trusts, usually far more than her own. Years and boyfriends come and go–sometimes a little too quickly, sometimes not nearly fast enough. But Jane’s counsel is constant, and on the subject of Sam, quite insistent. Stay away, Jane demands. He is your Mr. Wickham.

Still, everyone has something to learn about love–perhaps even Jane herself. And lately, the voice in Ellie’s head is being drowned out by another, urging her to look beyond everything she thought she knew and seek out her very own, very unexpected, happy ending. . .

Praise for ACCORDING TO JANE:

“A warm, witty and charmingly original story.” –Susan Wiggs, #1 New York Times bestselling author

“An engaging read for all who have been through the long, dark, dating wars, and still believe there’s sunshine, and a Mr. Darcy, at the end of the tunnel.” –Cathy Lamb, author of Henry’s Sisters

“This is a must-read for Austen lovers as well as for all who believe in the possibility of a happily-ever-after ending.” –Holly Chamberlin, author of One Week In December

An October “Fresh Pick” from Fresh Fiction!!

“Jane Austen fans will revel in this modern day unique twist on a classic, as well as learning interesting facts about Jane herself. There is just enough mystery of ‘why’ to keep you guessing, and the ending is thoroughly satisfying. This was a truly, irrevocably inspiring novel.”~Kelly Moran, Bookpleasures (5 stars)

“Just when you think Jane Austen could not appear in anything new, a refreshing reincarnation occurs as Marilyn Brant provides an engaging modern day take on the writer. Ellie is a terrific lead character as she adapts to the voice in her head while Sam is her nemesis…readers will thoroughly enjoy this fun contemporary romance that also provides insight into Jane Austen and her characters.”~Harriet Klausner (4 stars)

“According To Jane is a delight from beginning to end…a definite keeper that I can see myself returning to time and again, just for the happy pick me up feeling it gives me. I’m eagerly looking forward to Ms. Brant’s next book.”~Manic Readers (4.5 stars)

“All I can say is, again without any spoilers is that Marilyn Brant you have a new super fan and I am singing your praises…5 STARS–LOVED IT! COULDN’T PUT IT DOWN.”~Book Junkie (5 stars)

“According to Jane is an intriguing, appealing story full of warmth and wit…a fast read, perfect for the busy woman and the author has a definite gift for keeping you turning those pages. This is a book you don’t want to miss if you’re a fan of Austen, romance, coming of age, women’s fiction, or if you’re just looking for a highly entertaining story from an author with superb style and fresh voice.”~Working Girl Reviews (5 shoes/best book)

 Marilyn Brant is the award-winning women’s fiction author of ACCORDING TO JANE, the story of a modern woman who receives

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dating advice from the spirit of Jane Austen (October 2009), and her second forthcoming novel about three suburban moms who shake up their lives and their marriages (October 2010), both from Kensington Books.

As a former teacher, library staff member, freelance magazine writer and national book reviewer for Romantic Times, Marilyn has spent much of her life lost in literature. She received her M.A. in educational psychology from Loyola University Chicago, dabbled in both fiction and art at Northwestern University, studied the works of Austen at Oxford University and is an active member of the Jane Austen Society of North America. Her debut novel won RWA’s prestigious Golden Heart Award® in 2007.

Marilyn lives in the northern Chicago suburbs with her family, but she also hangs out online at her blog “Brant Flakes.” When she isn’t rereading Jane’s books or enjoying the latest releases by her writer friends, she’s working on her next novel, eating chocolate indiscriminately and hiding from the laundry.

Her website: http://www.marilynbrant.com

Hi Marilyn and welcome to my Journey! Can you tell us about your latest release and the inspiration behind it?

Hi Judi! Thanks for having me! My debut novel, According to Jane, is the story of a modern woman who–for almost two decades–has the ghost of Jane Austen in her head giving her dating advice. I first read Pride & Prejudice as a high-school freshman. Like my heroine Ellie, I raced through the novel way ahead of the reading assignments. I loved both the story and Austen’s writing style immediately. Her books changed the way I perceived the behavior of everyone around me, and I spent the rest of freshman year trying to figure out which Austen character each of my friends and family members most resembled! Also like Ellie, I had a few (okay, a lot) of less-than-wonderful boyfriends, and I would have loved to have been given romantic advice from the author I most respected and the one who’d written one of my all-time favorite love stories.

*Any great fan/fan mail stories you care to share?

The book was just released on September 29th, so first impressions are still coming in, but I’ve gotten some truly wonderful emails from people who read the ARCs this summer. One of my favorites is from a woman who won a copy of the book in a contest and emailed me to say that she’d finished the book in a day and was on an emotional high from reading it. She added, “Sometimes I go through phase where I’m so blase about reading fiction and focus mainly on non-fiction (my usual staple), but once in a blue moon, a book grips me and makes me fall in love with fiction again. Thank you. A very grateful reader.” I will always, always love that message!

*Which scene in your novel did you love writing and why?

One scene I had a lot of fun with was the bar scene in the first chapter where my main character runs into her ex-high-school boyfriend for the first time in four years. It was a situation I had never experienced personally, but I could imagine the comical possibilities so clearly and feel and the frustration of my heroine as if I’d been the one standing there, facing the jerk and his latest girlfriend, while Jane Austen ranted about how “insufferable” he was.

*What were some of your favorite books as a kid?

In junior high and early high school, I loved The Witch of Blackbird Pond by Elizabeth George Speare, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams, A Separate Peace by John Knowles, Love Story by Erich Segal, Illusions by Richard Bach and, of course, everything by Austen. When I was an elementary schooler, I also loved Caddie Woodlawn by Carol Ryrie Brink, Escape to Witch Mountain by Alexander Key and all the Nancy Drew mysteries.

*Which ‘craft’ book has inspired or helped you the most throughout your writing career?

I’m a BIG fan of craft books, so I have more than one! I used Blake Snyder’s SAVE THE CAT! almost religiously in the plotting of my past several books. I’m still very sad that he’s no longer with us. As far as a great reference guide, Robert McKee’s STORY is incredible. It has more information about writing craft than I can ever internalize. Also, whenever I need a more emotional pick-me-up, I grab the Ralph Keyes book THE COURAGE TO WRITE. I recommend it to everyone.

*If you could ask one author (in all of history) for one piece of advice, who would you ask and what you would want to know from them?

Oooh, getting to be like my main character here! If I could have asked Jane Austen for advice before I was married, it would have definitely revolved around which type of man was the right one for me. (She would intuitively know the answer, I’m sure.) However, even without Jane’s help, I was fortunate to find “my Darcy.”   Now, I would ask her for her thoughts on the crafting of a perfect novel. What were the qualities she felt a great piece of fiction should possess? What was she consciously trying to achieve with her novels?

*Do you have a sample chapter posted?

Yes! On my website I have a segment of Chapter One available for anyone interested in reading. It’s here: http://www.marilynbrant.com/extras.html Also, if you go to the Amazon page for According to Jane (here: http://www.amazon.com/According-Jane-Marilyn-Brant/dp/0758234619/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1238387155&sr=1-1), there’s a “Search Inside This Book” feature, and people can read samples from scenes throughout the novel.

*What is your author fantasy?

I’m secretly, unrelentingly ambitious, even when I have no right to be. Of course I want to hit the NYT bestseller list and get a movie deal. Also, I’d like an Oprah invitation and a few RITAs. However, these are not quite enough to satisfy every daydream I’ve ever had. I’d greatly enjoy winning an Emmy, a Grammy, an Oscar, a Tony and an Olympic gold medal (in both ice skating and gymnastics). The fact that I’m pathetic on skates and terrified of the uneven bars is, in no way, a deterrent from these unrealistic fantasies. My simple ability to *imagine* them, makes them almost real. Furthermore, I like shiny things (although I don’t like to dust them), so I hereby promise that if I win ANY heavy golden statuettes–ever–I will dust faithfully. Especially that Grammy award. Really.

*What’s next for you?

I get to visit a number of book clubs that chose my debut novel, According to Jane, as their monthly book pick–wildly fun!–while also starting the production/promotion process all over again for my next women’s fiction project. That second book is done, but we’re still working on finding the right title. It’s a modern fairytale about three suburban moms who shake up their marriages and their lives when one woman asks her friends a somewhat shocking question… That comes out in October 2010. 

*What’s one piece of writing advice you’ve found valuable on your journey to publication?

Don’t follow trends just because you think it’ll be an easier sell. And write the books that fit your voice. If what you love writing happens to be a hot-selling genre, great. If your writing voice happens to be perfect for the genre you want to write in and love to read, that’s awesome, too. But–if not–write long and hard enough to find what DOES fit you and your style best. Because then, even if it takes longer to make that first sale than you expect, you’re writing the kinds of stories you most enjoy, and that passion has a way of working itself into the projects you’re creating.

*Did you have any input on the cover, and are you happy with the finished product?

I was asked for input on the cover by my editor, and I sent Kensington pages of possible scene ideas, plus a plot summary and descriptions of the main characters. In the end, I have no idea whether or not my notes were helpful, but the cover didn’t look anything like I’d imagined it–it looked far, far better! I couldn’t be more pleased with the way our cover designer, Kristine Mills-Noble, envisioned the look of the book. I’m really excited to see what she’ll come up with for my second novel.

*What do you think readers might be surprised to know about you?

This has absolutely nothing to do with writing (which is, perhaps, why it’ll be surprising), but I was a member of a touring dance group in college and spent six weeks dancing through Europe the summer I was 19. We performed at festivals in France, Spain, Switzerland and Italy, and I met some absolutely fascinating people. That experience solidified both my love of travel and my lifelong adoration of the jitterbug. It also greatly aided in my appreciation of European men…

*Where do you write? Describe your writing space – is it a cluttered mess or minimalist heaven?!

I write in my home office–a messy, absolutely cluttered place–I won’t deny it! There are stacks of paper and towers of books everywhere, but also a very nice window overlooking our backyard. Sometimes I’ll write at a local coffee shop (either with my laptop or, most often, just with pen and notebook paper), and that location has the advantage of endless cups of coffee and occasional snacks.

*What are you reading at the moment?

Some entertaining Austen-inspired fiction, like Beth Pattillo’s Jane Austen Ruined My Life, and the amazing Shaffer/Barrows novel The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

*Are you a member of a writer’s group? If so, how has it helped your writing?

I’m a member of Chicago-North RWA, and it’s an incredibly strong critique chapter. Every month, three members have the opportunity to have up to 20 pages of their work critiqued by those attending the meetings (usually between 25-30 published/aspiring authors). The feedback is excellent, and it really helped me when I was a newbie to hear what more experienced writers were saying about some of my earlier work. Not only what confused them or what they thought was structurally unsound, but also what they felt were some of my writing strengths. That’s priceless insight when you’re just starting out. I can contrast this experience with semester-long university-level fiction workshops, which I personally didn’t find to be nearly as constructive. In my opinion, if a new writer ever finds herself surrounded by people whose main objective is to show off how clever they are or to alter a piece of writing in a way that messes with her author voice, she should sprint, not merely run, to the nearest exit. It worth hunting for a group that will help you build upon your writing talents while, at the same time, assisting you in strengthening your weaknesses.

*Could you please tell us a little about your writing background and how you made your first sale (including the title and publisher)?

Aside from being on the newspaper and yearbook staff in high school and publishing some academic work in college, I didn’t take writing seriously until I was about 30. I was a stay-at-home mom with a baby and desperately in need of a creative outlet, so I began writing poems, essays on being a parent and educational articles for family magazines. I wrote my first book having never taken a creative-writing class or even having read a book on the craft of fiction. (The lack of craft is very evident when I reread chapters from that first book, btw! I don’t recommend this level of ignorance…)  I got some feedback though–mostly negative–from a prominent literary agency, which led me to study fiction formally, delve into craft books and, eventually, go to my first writing conference. It was there that I heard about RWA. I joined, wrote three more unpublished manuscripts and, then, came up with the idea for According to Jane. My agent signed me on this book and submitted it to editors, but it needed to be significantly restructured before it sold. Nine months after it won the Golden Heart and was revised (again), it finally did sell–to John Scognamiglio at Kensington–on a sunny and surrealistic day in April 2008.

Thanks so much for stopping by, Marilyn, and I wish you much success!

Book information:

Title: According to Jane
Author: Marilyn Brant
Publisher: Kensington Books (trade paperback)
Price: $14.00 U.S./$16.95 Canada
Release Date: October 1, 2009 (on-shelf date: Sept. 29, 2009)
ISBN-13: 978-0-7582-3461-2
Pages: 288
Links to my page on Kensington: http://www.kensingtonbooks.com/catalog.cfm?dest=itempg&itemid=14890&secid=258&linkon=section&linkid=258
And to Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/According-Jane-Marilyn-Brant/dp/0758234619/ref=ed_oe_p

An Author Getting Some “Air Time”

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Some would say, It’s Prime Time for Air Time! Here’s what else is being said:

“Sassy, fast-paced and appealing. First-class entertainment.” Sue Grafton

“I love this series!” Suzanne Brockmann

“AIR TIME is a fun, fast read with a heroine who’s sexy, stylish, and smart. I loved it.” Nancy Pickard

Smart and savvy Boston TV reporter Charlotte McNally is back. In AIR TIME she’s taking on the fashion industry, where she learns “When purses are fake – the danger is real.” AIR TIME is the third of the back-to-back-to back Charlie mysteries—the first PRIME TIME (also in bookstores now) won the Agatha Award for best first novel. FACE TIME (also in bookstores now) is a BookSense notable book.
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Let’s hear from Hank in her own words:

1.) How did you come up with the idea for this book?

Imagine the research I had to do into the world of designer purses! It was tough, but someone had to dive in…

Actually, Charlie’s investigation into the world of counterfeit couture came straight from been there-done that. In my day job as a TV reporter, my producer (not Franklin!) and I have done several in-depth investigations into the world of knock-offs—not only purses and scarves, but blue jeans and watches and DVDs and videos.

We went undercover and with a hidden camera—like Charlie does—into various back-alley stores where counterfeit merchandise was being sold, and also into some suburban purse parties where women—certainly knowing they were fake and thinking it was fine—were scooping up piles of counterfeit Burberrys and Chanels.

You should know— law enforcement tells us, it’s not illegal to buy the purses—unless you’re buying large amounts that are obviously for resale. The illegality is in the copying and manufacture and sale of what’s clearly a trademarked and proprietary item. (As the elegant fashion exec Zuzu Mazny-Latos tells Charlie in AIR TIME—it’s like taking Gone with the Wind—and putting your name on the cover.)

Anyway—lots of AIR TIME is based on research and reality—besides the undercover work, and the research, I’ve done many interviews with the federal agencies in charge of battling counterfeiting, the attorneys who help big companies protest their products, and even the private investigators the designers hire to scout out counterfeits.

2.)Are you more driven by plot or by character?

Ah, it’s both. I start with one little germ of a plot twist–and then figure out how Charlie is going to figure it out! So I know what I know–and she knows what she knows. And then she has to solve the mystery–based on what I let her know.

3.) Who’s your favorite character in this book and why?

Oh, I can’t possibly answer that. Charlie McNally is dear to my heart of course. When my husband talks about Charlie, he calls her “you.” As in: when “you” get chased by the bad guys, or when “you” get held at gunpoint. And I have to remind him, “Sweetheart, it’s fiction.” But Charlie can say things I can’t say about the reality of television, and because she’s fictional, she can go places I can’t go. And say things I can’t say!

And the very sweet 8-year-old Penny, I must say, touches me every time I write about her And I get so many letters from readers, concerned about her, and asking about her, and who I based her on. But really? She’s right out of my imagination. (She’s the character who sometimes makes readers cry…along with Charlie’s mother. I guess family relationships are sometimes—universal.)

And in AIR TIME there’s a new character, a gorgeous FBI agent named Keresey Stone. She’s amazing. And unpredictable. But I wonder what you’ll think about her?

3.) What’s your writing process/writing environment like?

I’ve been a television reporter since 19, um, 75. I’m still on the air at Boston’s NBC affiliate, and still at work as an investigative reporter. (And I’m always hoping my best story ever is just around the corner.) So I come to work at Channel 7 every morning—tracking down clues, doing research, hoping for justice and looking for a great story that will change people’s lives. (Hmm..sounds a lot like mystery writing!)

Then at night we go back home—and when I’m in writing mode, I write til about ten pm, in a wonderful study that’s lined with bookshelves. I admit—I have a cluttered desk, and no real filing system, except for “piles.” But I know where everything is. I like it to be quiet.. At the TV station, it’s chaotic and loud, with three TV’s blasting all the time—and I can work fine there! But at home, with the books—quiet.

Because my schedule is so tight, I keep track of my words. If I know I have to write 90,000 words by the deadline, I literally divide that number by the number of days I have—and then set that as a goal. If I can do that, I’m thrilled.

I push my way through a first draft. I say to myself—just get the story down. Just do it. And you can fix it later.

Then I cook dinner, and my husband and I have a very late dinner together! You can imagine how patient he is!

I used to be a pretty good cook, and diligent about exercise. My husband and I gave dinner parties and went to movies and went on vacation. Sigh. That’s all pretty much over. I have a full time job as reporter, a full time job as a mystery author, and a full time job as a wife (with two step-children and two step-grandchildren!) That doesn’t leave much time for much else.

4.) What’s your favorite part of writing?

Revision, no question. I love that. You have this whole first draft, and you get to go back and see what you really have. I often have wonderful revelations when I read over the first draft—there are themes and rhythms and even clues that I didn’t realize were there! It’s always so rewarding.

And after 30 years in TV, I know how valuable editing is—so I look at it as a real treat. To get to polish, and tweak, and rearrange, and make it all shine—oh, it’s great fun.

The other favorite part—when readers love the books. I can’t tell you how often I’m out on a story, for instance, and a stranger will come up to me , and pull the book out of a purse or briefcase, and ask me to sign it. I can barely resist bursting into tears. It somehow completes the writing, you know? when someone reads it.

5.) What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever gotten about writing?

There’s a plaque on my bulletin board with the question: “What would you attempt to do if you know you could not fail?” That gives me a lot of courage.

Hank’s giving away five ARC’s of PRIME TIME to readers…to enter the drawing contact her through her website and put ‘PRIME TIME ARC’ in the subject line!

Other books by Hank:

HPRfacetime72med   HPRprimetime72med

Crossing Washington Square – A Novel

crossing wash sq.indd

 

Across Washington Square live two very different women …with their very different love of books.

Some women follow their hearts; others follow their minds. In this “charming, witty, and cerebral” second novel from the acclaimed author of The Professors’ Wives’ Club, we return to Manhattan University, where two strong-willed women are compelled to unite their senses and sensibilities.

Professor Diana Monroe is a highly respected scholar of Sylvia Plath. Serious and aloof, she steadfastly keeps her mind on track. Professor Rachel Grey is young and impulsive, with a penchant for teaching popular women’s fiction like Bridget Jones’ Diary and The Devil Wears Prada, and for wearing her heart on her sleeve.

The two conflicting personalities meet head to heart when Carson McEvoy, a handsome and brilliant professor visiting from Harvard, sets his eyes on both women and creates even more tension between them. Now Diana and Rachel are slated to accompany an undergraduate trip to London, where an almost life-threatening experience with a student celebrity will force them to change their minds and heal their hearts…together.

 Advance Praise for CROSSING WASHINGTON SQUARE

 “As readers spend time with these bright and engaging women, Rendell offers an interesting debate about the merits of studying popular fiction in an academic setting.” The Romantic Times

 “Rendell’s second novel is thoughtful and open, with plenty of interesting academic debate for truly bookish readers.” Booklist 

 “For every reader who has ever wondered why nineteenth century novels about women are called ‘the canon’, but contemporary novels about women are called ‘chick-lit’ comes a charming, witty and cerebral novel about Rachel Grey, an Austen-worth heroine fighting for love and respect in the academic shark tank.” Nicola Kraus, New York Times bestselling coauthor of The Nanny Diaries

 “Joanne Rendell has done it again! Crossing Washington Square is a book that will stay with you long after you turn that final page. Curl up on a park bench somewhere, watch the leaves fall, and spend some much beloved time with Rachel and Diana.” Jessica Brody, bestselling author of The Fidelity Files and Love Under Cover

 “Joanne Rendell admirably reveals the hypocrisy of an academic culture that claims to want to understand people and the world they live in, but refuses to take seriously the forms of culture that matter to them.” Professor Lawrence Grossberg, Morris Davis Distinguished Professor of Communication Studies and Cultural Studies at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

 Praise for THE PROFESSORS’ WIVES’ CLUB 

 “Alternately amusing and serious, with a little literary mystery thrown in for good measure, Rendell’s smart and pleasing tale of friendship and self-actualization has broad appeal.” Booklist 

 “[A] fun read about a wonderful group of friends.” Kate Jacobs, NYT’s bestselling author of The Friday Night Knitting Club

 “charming…a delight.” Christina Baker Kline, author of The Way Life Should Be

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

DSC_0091_edited-1small

 

 

Joanne Rendell was born and raised in the UK. After completing her PhD in English Literature, she moved to the States to be with her husband, a professor at NYU. She now lives in faculty housing in New York City with her family. Visit Joanne’s website at www.joannerendell.com.

 

 

Links:

Amazon http://www.amazon.com/Crossing-Washington-Square-Joanne-Rendell/dp/0451227840/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1239050663&sr=1-3

Borders http://www.borders.com/online/store/TitleDetail?sku=0451227840

B&N http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Crossing-Washington-Square/Joanne-Rendell/e/9780451227843/?itm=3

Powells http://www.powells.com/biblio/62-9780451227843-0

Penguin http://us.penguingroup.com/nf/Book/BookDisplay/0,,9780451227843,00.html?Crossing_Washington_Square_Joanne_Rendell

 

 Hi Joanne and thanks so much for stopping by. A few questions for you:

1. Any fan/fan mail stories you care to share?

Thanks for having me, Judi! My first novel was The Professors’ Wives Club. A couple of months after its release, a woman contacted me and said she’d read and enjoyed the book. She told me she was a professor’s wife and after a few emails, she revealed that she was the wife of a very distinguished professor of cultural studies whose work I’d read, who I’d seen giving keynotes talks at conferences, and whose work greatly influenced the writing of Crossing Washington Square. Not really a “rock star” moment, but still exciting to know the wives of influential professors (professors I really dig!) read my book.

 2. I find it easiest to write when I’m completely secluded from everything, be it at Borders with my earphones in, or in my office, also with my earphones in. Where do you write? 

I write at my desk at the front of our apartment. We live on a very busy street in Manhattan so my writing is lulled by taxis honking, firetrucks hooting, and jackhammers pounding. With all this practice, I could probably keep writing through a asteroid shower!

3. What was your inspiration behind your latest novel?

The idea for Crossing Washington Square evolved over a few years. As someone who has lived the academic life (I have a PhD in literature and now I’m married to a professor at NYU), I’ve always loved books about the university – novels like Michael Chabon’s Wonder Boys, Richard Russo’s The Straight Man, Zadie Smith’s On Beauty, and Francine Prose’s Blue Angel. But what I noticed about such campus fiction was the lack of female professors in leading roles. Even the female authors like Francine Prose and Zadie Smith’s novels focus on male professors. Furthermore, most of these male professors are disillusioned drunks who quite often sleep with their students! I wanted to write a novel with women professors taking the lead and I wanted these women to be strong and smart and interesting  instead of drunk, despondent, and preoccupied with questionable sexual liaisons!

4. What line or section of your novel are you most proud of?

Rachel Grey and Diana Monroe are both literature professors in the old boys club of Manhattan University. While this should create a kinship between them, they are very much at odds. Rachel is young, emotional, and impulsive. She wrote a book about women’s book groups which got her a slot on Oprah and she uses chick lit in her classes. Diana is aloof, icy, and controlled. She’s also a scholar of Sylvia Plath who thinks “beach” fiction is an easy ride for students. My favorite scene is where these two women face-off in a department meeting. Neither of the professors is a shrinking violet and thus sparks really fly! The scene was such fun to write.

5. If you were in charge of casting the movie adaptation of your book, who gets the call?

Crossing Washington Square loosely echoes Austen’s Sense and Sensibilty with one professor being led by her sense, the other by her sensibility. I love the Ang Lee adaptation of Sense and Sensibility with Emma Thompson and Kate Winslet playing the two very different Dashwood sisters. I’d love Emma and Kate to play my professors too!

6. Is writing your main job?  If not, what do you do for your real source of income and how does it impact your writing?

When I’m not writing, I’m hanging out with my six year old son who is homeschooled. Although, “homeschool” is somewhat of a misnomer as we spend a relatively small amount of time schooling at “home.” We live in New York so are lucky enough to have an amazing array of fun and educational places on our doorstep. Benny and I, together with his homeschooled friends, are always out on trips to the Met, the Natural History Museum, aquariums, zoos, galleries, libraries, and parks. When we’re not out and about, Benny and I love to read either together or separately. I’m so thankful he loves books like I do!

7. What is one of the nicest compliments that you have ever received about your book(s)?

One of the nicest compliments I’ve gotten for Crossing Washington Square (so far – I hope there are more to come!) was from Lawrence Grossberg who is a distinguished professor at The University of North Carolina. He is a very big deal in the world of academia and I was so excited that he not only read it, but also said the book “admirably reveals the hypocrisy of an academic culture that claims to want to understand people and the world they live in, but refuses to take seriously the forms of culture that matter to them.” The book is not just for “high fallutin’ ” professors, of course! But it was exciting for me that a distinguished professor liked it.

8. What’s next for you?  

I’m working on final edits for my third novel (which was bought by Penguin last fall). The novel tells the story of a woman who thinks she might be related to the nineteenth century writer, Mary Shelley. On her journey to seek the truth and to discover if there really is a link between her own family and the creator of Frankenstein, Clara unearths surprising facts about people much closer to home – including some shocking secrets about the ambitious scientist she is engaged to. The book is told in alternating points of view between Clara and the young Mary Shelley who is preparing to write Frankenstein.

9. New readers want to know about your book! In 2-3 sentences, can you tell us the basic premise?

Crossing Washington Square is a story of two very different women and their very different love of books. Rachel Grey and Diana Monroe are both literature professors in the old boys club of Manhattan University. While this should create a kinship between them, they are very much at odds and when a brilliant and handsome professor from Harvard comes to town and sets his sights on both women, sparks really fly!

10. Who’s your favorite character and why?

 That’s a tough one! My knee jerk response is to say Professor Rachel Grey because, out of the two female leads, I identify most with her. Rachel teaches chick lit in her classes and has to defend her work and the genre to her stuffy colleagues who think only the classics and literary fiction should be studied. As a grad student, I would be reading classical literature and poetry by day, but then secretly read popular women’s fiction at night (Bridget Jones’ Diary, I have to say, is one of my all time favorite books!).  Rachel is also flawed and emotional, yet good and honest and brave. I like that about her.

Every time I revisit the book, however, I like Professor Diana Monroe more too. She’s super smart and has great poise and grace as a teacher. She’s the kind of uber-professor that every academic secretly wants to be. She’s also pretty darn scary in her austerity and brilliance. But she has a vulnerability too and her life started out pretty tough and therefore, every time I revisit the book, I like her more. 

11.  For you, what is the most difficult part of being an author?

Settling down to write. Once I get going, I love it. But there’s just that hurdle of getting going which is so hard — especially these days when there are so many demands on authors to go online and promote our books. It is wonderful to meet people and connect and learn through the internet, but the web is also a huge procrastination vortex! I sometimes kid myself I’m doing promo work, but really I’m just wasting time snooping around on Facebook or reading other people’s tweets about what they ate for breakfast!

Ha! I can so relate to that!

Thanks so much for stopping by and all the best with Crossing Washington Square- and the final edits on the third book!

Children of the Waters, by Carleen Brice

children of the waters

CHILDREN OF THE WATERS (A One World Trade Paperback Original; On Sale: June 23, 2009) by Carleen Brice—author of the #1 Denver Post bestseller and Essence Book Club Pick Orange Mint and Honey—explores the connection between love and race, and what it really means to be family.

Brice’s compelling, eagerly anticipated new novel CHILDREN OF THE WATERS  strikes deep emotional chords and poses the intriguing question: Can two strangers become sisters?

Trish Taylor’s white ancestry never got in the way of her love for her black ex-husband, or their mixed race son, Will.  But when Trish’s marriage ends, she returns to her family’s Denver, Colorado home to find a sense of identity and connect to her past.

What she finds there shocks her to the very core: her mother and newborn sister were not killed in a car crash as she was told.  In fact, her baby sister, Billie Cousins, is now a grown woman; her grandparents had put her up for adoption, unwilling to raise the child of a black man.  Billie, who had no idea she was adopted, wants nothing to do with Trish until a tragedy in Billie’s own family forces her to lean on her surprisingly supportive and sympathetic sister.  Together they unravel the age-old layers of secrets and resentments and navigate a path toward love, healing, and true reconciliation..

Essence wrote that Orange Mint and Honey “will have you hooked from page one”—and so will Brice’s latest. 

About the Authorcarleenbriceauthorphoto

Carleen Brice is author of the novel Orange Mint and Honey and Lead Me Home: An African American’s Guide Through the Grief Journey.  She is also editor of the anthology Age Ain’t Nothing but a Number: Black Women Explore Midlife.  Her book Walk Tall: Affirmations for People of Color sold over 100,000 copies.  She lives in Denver with her husband and two cats where she writes, gardens, and blogs about writing and gardening.  Please visit her through her website, www.carleenbrice.com.

Carleen Brice’s debut novel, Orange Mint and Honey, was an Essence
“Recommended Read” and a Target “Bookmarked Breakout Book.” For this book, she won the 2009 First Novelist Award from the Black Caucus of the American Library Association and the 2008 Break Out Author Award at the African American Literary Awards Show. Orange Mint and Honey was optioned by Lifetime Movie Network.

Her second novel, Children of the Waters (One World/Ballantine), a
book about race, love and family, just came out at the end of June.
Booklist Online called it “a compelling read, difficult to put down.”
Essence says, “Brice has a new hit.” You can read an excerpt at her
website www.carleenbrice.com.

She is at work on her third novel, Calling Every Good Wish Home, and
she maintains the blogs “White Readers Meet Black Authors” http://www.welcomewhitefolks.blogspot.com and “The Pajama Gardener” www.pajamagardener.blogspot.com.

 CHILDREN OF THE WATERS

By Carleen Brice

A One World Trade Paperback Original; On Sale: June 23, 2009

978-0-345-49907-3; $14.00; 224 pp

Judi: Hi Carleen and thanks so much for stopping by my blog to answer a few questions about your book. What was the inspiration behind it?

Carleen: CHILDREN OF THE WATERS is a story about 2 women, 1 white and 1 black, who find out they’re related. The inspiration was my sister-in-law who shared with me meeting her birth sister.

Judi: Any fan/fan mail stories you care to share? The good, the bad and the ugly.

Carleen: My best reader story is a woman who, after reading my first
novel ORANGE MINT AND HONEY, planned to tell her recovering alcoholic mother she forgave her. I also had a self-described middle-aged white guy email me that he “cried like a baby” after reading that same book.

Judi: When deadlines hit, what happens in your house?

Carleen: It gets messier and stays messier longer.

Judi: Do you put your friends in your books? Names, incidents,
characteristics? Have any of them recognized themselves in a not-so-
good way?

Carleen: I have put aspects of my friends in my books, but always
with plenty of advance notice. One night over drinks some friends
shared stories of shopping for vibrators. 2 of those are in my latest!

Judi: What is the most memorable first line you’ve ever read in a novel?

Carleen: “We have been lost to each other for so long.” The first line of THE RED TENT made me keep reading.

Judi: Which do you most like writing–dialogue, action, or description?

Carleen: Dialogue comes most naturally.

Thanks, Carleen. Wishing you all the best with this book! Congratulations!

 

Authors After Dark Readers Conference

Save the date! October 23-25, 2009 – The Authors After Dark Paranormal Weekend is filling up fast! Sign up by August 1st to get the lowest membership rate of $160 for the weekend. (After August 1st, the membership goes to $175.)

The event is being held at the Suffern, NY Holiday Inn, located conveniently about 1 hour from New York City and most of the area’s major airports. Guest include:

Jacquelyn Frank

Sunny

Joey W. Hill

Stella and Audra Price

Bianca D’Arc

Rosemary Laurey

Jennifer Armintrout

Madeline Oh

Georgia Evans

Mechele Armstrong

Samantha Sommersby

Cat Johnson

Cathy Clamp

Eliza Gayle

Diana Castilleja

Leigh Ellwood

Tilly Greene

Selena Illyria

Adra Steia

Stephanie Julian

Judi Fennell

Kayleigh Jamison

Donna Grant

Robin T. Popp

Linda Mooney

Mima

 

Area attractions include the phenomenal shopping at Woodbury Common (http://www.premiumoutlets.com/outlets/outlet.asp?id=7) and the Forest of Fear (http://www.theforestoffear.com/home.php), held on the site of the New York State Renaissance Faire at Sterling Forest.

The convention is limited to 200 attendees so your “face time” with your favorite authors is maximized. We’re having loads of panel discussions, parties and a fantabulous dealer’s room. We’ll also be holding a massive charity raffle to benefit the CAN and Pets Alive – a local no kill animal shelter.

Sign up now for the best rates! The conference registration is only $160 until August 1st ($175 after August 1st) and the hotel is $99 per night, double occupancy. Lots to do in the area will make this a weekend you will never forget!

I’m excited to be participating this year and hope you’ll join us!

RWA Saturday

Sourcebooks book signing and Rita/GH Awards – Congrats to all the winners!

RWA Friday

Just t

he pictures b/c I’m running out for a panel.

This Little Mommy Stayed Home

SW Cover[1]Praise for Samantha Wilde:

“Here’s a talent: when a narrator’s doldrums make a reader laugh out loud. Samantha Wilde’s inkwell must be filled with truth-serum because this brave and funny book gets the postpartum peaks and valleys so very, winningly right.”

—Elinor Lipman, author of Then She Found Me

 

“Think of the funniest person you know, give her a baby and a month without sleep, multiply by ten and you’ve got the incomparable Samantha Wilde rocking the hilariously appalling realities of motherhood and the modern marriage. This book belongs on the bedside table of everyone who’s ever been a mother, or had one.”

Karen Karbo, author of The Stuff of Life and How to Hepburn

 

“[This] is the funniest novel I’ve read in a long, long time. What a treat! Mothers everywhere deserve this book.”

—Ellen Meister, author of The Smart One

 

“Samantha Wilde is the irreverent, knowing, laugh-out-loud, brutally honest but most treasured best friend that every new mommy craves and every reader relishes.  They should issue this smart, hilarious novel along with newborn onesies and nursing pads.”
—Pamela Redmond Satran, author of Babes in Captivity

 

“Riotously hilarious, unabashedly honest and positively impossible to put down. Samantha Wilde’s debut is a must read for all moms and non-moms alike.”

—Jessica Brody, author of The Fidelity Files

This summer, Samantha Wilde makes her literary debut with THIS LITTLE MOMMY STAYED HOME, a fresh and funny novel about a new mother who discovers the wonders and terrors of motherhood—one hilarious crisis at a time. The book will be published as a Bantam Trade Paperback Original on June 23, 2009.

The novel introduces Joy McGuire who has gone from being skinny and able to speak in complete sentences to someone who hasn’t changed her sweatpants in weeks. But now with a new baby to care for, she feels like a woman on the brink and as she scrambles to recapture the person she used to be she takes another look at the woman she is: a stay-at-home mom in love with her son, if a bit addled about everything else. As a new mom herself, Wilde, a graduate of Yale Divinity School, wrote THIS LITTLE MOMMY STAYED HOME after the birth of her son when she was experiencing the ups and downs of new motherhood. According to Wilde, “I wrote the book because I couldn’t not write it. I took my lap top to my bed during my son’s naps and wrote and wrote. I wrote the book I wanted to read. The book takes a hard look at the effects of new motherhood on a woman and on a marriage through the eyes of one stressed but insightful woman. It’s a story that will keep mothers going when they think they can’t go any further.”

With THIS LITTLE MOMMY STAYED HOME, Samantha Wilde brings a candid and hilarious light to the universal story of new motherhood.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Samantha Wilde is the mother of two born in under two years. A graduate of Concord Academy, Smith College, Yale Divinity School and The New Seminary, she lives in Western Massachusetts with her husband and children. She is the daughter of novelist Nancy Thayer. When she’s not mothering her toddler and baby, she writes, teaches yoga, and moonlights as a minister. Although she never sleeps, she’s never once been tempted to give her children away to the highest bidder (well, almost never). She’s currently using nap times to write her second novel for Bantam Dell. You can visit her at wildemama.blogspot.com

THIS LITTLE MOMMY STAYED HOME

by Samantha Wilde

A Bantam Trade Paperback Original

June 23, 2009/ 978-0-385-34266-7/ $12.00

Thanks, Sam, for taking time out of your busy Mommy schedule – I stayed at home, too. Still am at home, and, honestly, teens might need Mom around more than the younger ones!

So, are your children readers and have they become more so because you write? What do they think about what you do and the pursuit of your dream?

My babies, three and one, both love to read. My son, who can’t actually read, often “reads” to himself, making up stories. He treats books like special blankets. And the nice part is, even though he is so young, he can understand what it means that “mama wrote a book.” Meanwhile my daughter, at one, loves the cover. She’s crazy for pictures of babies.

When deadlines hit, what happens in your house?

I get more tired. The toilet bowl has to wait until late at night to be cleaned. I “stay-at-home” with my kids, so that’s my real job. If anything suffers during deadlines, it’s the house, which is not so tidy to begin with. No, that’s not true. It’s me who suffers. I won’t nap, and I’ll stay up later. I’ll forego a shower or a walk. So I guess I’m saying that I get stinky and fat. That doesn’t sound very good, does it?

If you weren’t writing, what would you be doing instead?

I’d teach yoga, which I do once a week anyway. And be with my kids more, though it hardly seems possible. Or maybe I’d just be lying in bed reading and eating chocolate. That would be nice. But then you didn’t mean if I wasn’t writing AND was wealthy, did you?

Have you given your favorite names to characters yet or are you waiting for that special character and book?

I’m saving my best names for my children.

Thanks so much for visiting, Sam!

Praise for Samantha Wilde:

“Here’s a talent: when a narrator’s doldrums make a reader laugh out loud. Samantha Wilde’s inkwell must be filled with truth-serum because this brave and funny book gets the postpartum peaks and valleys so very, winningly right.”

—Elinor Lipman, author of Then She Found Me

 

“Think of the funniest person you know, give her a baby and a month without sleep, multiply by ten and you’ve got the incomparable Samantha Wilde rocking the hilariously appalling realities of motherhood and the modern marriage. This book belongs on the bedside table of everyone who’s ever been a mother, or had one.”

Karen Karbo, author of The Stuff of Life and How to Hepburn

 

“[This] is the funniest novel I’ve read in a long, long time. What a treat! Mothers everywhere deserve this book.”

—Ellen Meister, author of The Smart One

 

“Samantha Wilde is the irreverent, knowing, laugh-out-loud, brutally honest but most treasured best friend that every new mommy craves and every reader relishes.  They should issue this smart, hilarious novel along with newborn onesies and nursing pads.”
—Pamela Redmond Satran, author of Babes in Captivity

 

“Riotously hilarious, unabashedly honest and positively impossible to put down. Samantha Wilde’s debut is a must read for all moms and non-moms alike.”

—Jessica Brody, author of The Fidelity Files

This summer, Samantha Wilde makes her literary debut with THIS LITTLE MOMMY STAYED HOME, a fresh and funny novel about a new mother who discovers the wonders and terrors of motherhood—one hilarious crisis at a time. The book will be published as a Bantam Trade Paperback Original on June 23, 2009.

The novel introduces Joy McGuire who has gone from being skinny and able to speak in complete sentences to someone who hasn’t changed her sweatpants in weeks. But now with a new baby to care for, she feels like a woman on the brink and as she scrambles to recapture the person she used to be she takes another look at the woman she is: a stay-at-home mom in love with her son, if a bit addled about everything else. As a new mom herself, Wilde, a graduate of Yale Divinity School, wrote THIS LITTLE MOMMY STAYED HOME after the birth of her son when she was experiencing the ups and downs of new motherhood. According to Wilde, “I wrote the book because I couldn’t not write it. I took my lap top to my bed during my son’s naps and wrote and wrote. I wrote the book I wanted to read. The book takes a hard look at the effects of new motherhood on a woman and on a marriage through the eyes of one stressed but insightful woman. It’s a story that will keep mothers going when they think they can’t go any further.”

With THIS LITTLE MOMMY STAYED HOME, Samantha Wilde brings a candid and hilarious light to the universal story of new motherhood.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Samantha Wilde is the mother of two born in under two years. A graduate of Concord Academy, Smith College, Yale Divinity School and The New Seminary, she lives in Western Massachusetts with her husband and children. She is the daughter of novelist Nancy Thayer. When she’s not mothering her toddler and baby, she writes, teaches yoga, and moonlights as a minister. Although she never sleeps, she’s never once been tempted to give her children away to the highest bidder (well, almost never). She’s currently using nap times to write her second novel for Bantam Dell. You can visit her at wildemama.blogspot.com

THIS LITTLE MOMMY STAYED HOME

by Samantha Wilde

A Bantam Trade Paperback Original

June 23, 2009/ 978-0-385-34266-7/ $12.00

 

 

 

 

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